AC: Alphacrucis College

Master of Arts

The Master of Arts integrates cutting edge principles in theology, Biblical studies, leadership, and contextual studies with Biblical values, to equip professionals in all contexts. Students range from pastors and leaders in church-based organisations to IT professionals, doctors, and business men and women. Our lecturers are academics as well as experts in the field who bring contemporary practices and Biblical insights to the classroom based on their daily experience.

inspired learning for influential living

Welcome to the Master of Arts at AC, where we believe in inspired learning for influential living. Our classes integrate cutting edge principles in theology, Biblical studies, leadership, and contextual studies with Biblical values, to equip professionals in all contexts. Our students range from pastors and leaders in church-based organisations to IT professionals, doctors, and business men and women. Our lecturers are academics as well as experts in the field who bring contemporary practices and Biblical insights to the classroom based on their daily experience.

The Master of Arts is designed with the purpose of integrating three main areas of Christian Studies, Spirituality and Context, and Skills and Application. Beginning with foundational units in Theology, Ethics, Bible, and Critical thinking, the students can then progress to an area of specialisation of their choice. One of the key features of Master of Arts is the Integrated Project (or Research Project) requirement that provides the opportunity for students to synthesise what they have learned by engaging a particular issue in their area of specialisation. The students also have a selection of electives that range from Ancient Languages to Marketing, to add to their learning experience.

I invite you to experience postgraduate education as you have never before.

Dr Robyn Wrigley-Carr

PhD, MCS, MA, B.Ed (Hons), ATCL.

Apply online here.


The Master of Arts is designed to provide a general postgraduate-level education, with the opportunity to specialise in certain subject areas. Students can major in one of the following areas:

  • Christian Studies
  • History
  • Cross-cultural Ministry
  • Communication
  • Pastoral Ministry

The Master of Arts is designed to produce graduates who have an in-depth understanding of Christian worldview and its integration with vocation and community. In addition to developing skills in critical thinking, problem-solving, teamwork, and communication skills, the graduates will be equipped with advanced knowledge of theory in their area of specialisation and the application of theoretical concepts in practical settings. It also prepares students for further study by inclusion within the structured program of some independent research.

The MA consists of 12 subjects; 2 core subjects (RES401 and THE401), 4 subjects in major area, 5 electives, and 1 independent guided research project.

The MA can be completed in 1.5 years of full-time study or 3 years of part-time study (maximum candidacy 7 years). Students must complete at least 6 subjects (20 credit points) at 500 level or above.

Rev. Associate Professor Denise Austin (faculty profile)

Ps Narelle Coetzee (faculty profile)

Graduating with a BNurs(hons) in 2000, Narelle moved from Canberra to work in Orange Base Hospital, primarily on the male surgical ward. In 2003 she moved to Sydney to study midwifery and worked at Nepean Hospital. Once graduating with her GradDip of Midwifery, she continued at Nepean Hospital in the postnatal ward part-time, and commenced her studies at Southern Cross College, completing a MDiv in 2009. During this time Narelle started to tutor and lecture in Old Testament studies at SCC. In 2010, she enrolled in a PhD through University of Birmingham, UK. Currently Narelle is an Associate Lecturer in Old Testament studies and the Registrar. Narelle is loving her research studies and the bonus of travelling to the UK every year. She is also active in her local church, Rivers Edge Church, a new church plant in the Newington area, where her faith can be outworked in the community.

Rev. Associate Professor Jacqueline Grey (faculty profile)

Graduating with a BA in 1994, Jacqui served as the AOG chaplain and campus director for Students For Christ at Sydney University until 1998. After studying at Southern Cross, she completed her honours and doctoral studies through CSU, graduating in 2006. Jacqui has served as the Student Dean (2002-2005), Dean of Christian Studies (2006-2008) and Academic Dean of the College (2009-2014). Currently, Jacqui is associate professor of Biblical Studies, specialising in Old Testament studies. Her publications include Them, Us and Me: How the Old Testament Speaks to People Today, Raising Women Leaders (edited volume with Shane Clifton), and Three's A Crowd: Pentecostalism, Hermeneutics and the Old Testament  as well as various articles and book chapters. Jacqui is an ordained minister of the Australian Christian Churches, and speaks regularly at local and international events. She has also appeared on various national TV and radio programs in Australia, including the ABC TV's Q&A program. Jacqui is committed to the mission of higher education in the church, and provides assistance to Pentecostal colleges in developing their institutional goals. She currently serves on the executive of the Society of Pentecostal Studies, and is part of the steering committee for Biblical Ethics in the Society of Biblical Literature. Her research interests include pentecostal hermeneutics, prophetic literature and feminist readings of Scripture. Jacqui is a member of Mountains Church (a church plant of Hawkesbury Church). She loves travelling, photography, art and coffee with friends.

Jacqui is a member of the TEQSA Register of Experts.

Rev. Kevin Hovey (faculty profile)

Kevin's current role, Head of Department: Pastoral and Cross Cultural Ministry, is an interesting convergence of many experiences and roles covering more than 40 years as an ordained minister of the Australian Christian Churches.

Starting with 31 years as a missionary in Papua New Guinea, ministry was focused on developing and training local leaders. This ranged from informal mentoring in remote villages to developing Bible college structures and curriculum. Serving as consultant to the National Executive Council of Assemblies of God of Papua New Guinea provided opportunities for input – and for growth.

While still on field, the need for missionary training became evident, so the internationally recognized World Harvest Institute “missionary finishing program”, as some have termed it. Post Papua New Guinea, missionary leadership, missionary strategy and missionary training roles have continued to keep a focus on task of mission, but with a greater focus on seeing that outworked through local churches. 

Kevin’s current PhD studies are focused on the missiology of the Australian missiologist, Dr Alan Tippett. The thesis particularly looks at the application of his insights to 21st century missions. Serving as the Oceania representative on the Pentecostal World Fellowship’s World Missions Commission maintains a global edge, rubbing shoulders with key mission leaders from around the world.

Dr Ian Jagelman (faculty profile)

Ian spent fifteen years in public accounting with Price Waterhouse Coopers including stints in Papua New Guinea and Fiji where he set up their tax consulting division.

For 20 years he served as the Senior Pastor of Christian City Church, Lane Cove, an evangelical/Pentecostal church in the northern region of Sydney.  A church plant in 1984, it grew to in excess of 1100 active members by December 2002 when the church was restructured to create three autonomous churches at Lane Cove, Ryde and Carlingford.

In the Christian world he is also recognised as having a teaching gift expressed through Truth for Life Ministries, a division of The Jagelman Institute.

Celeste Kumar (faculty profile)

Mr Johnny Kumar (faculty profile)

Andrew Mellor (faculty profile)

Professor Paul Oslington (faculty profile)

Paul Oslington joined Alphacrucis in January 2013.  He held a Chair jointly in the School of Business and School of Theology at Australian Catholic University from 2008-2013, and continues there as an Adjunct Professor. Before that he was Associate Professor of Economics at University of New South Wales, and held visiting positions at University of Oxford in 1999, University of British Columbia and Regent College Vancouver in 2003, and Princeton Theological Seminary and University in 2006/7. His PhD in Economics and Master of Economics/Econometrics with Honours were completed at the University of Sydney, and Bachelor of Divinity through Melbourne College of Divinity.

Rev Dr David Parker (faculty profile)

After experiencing almost every church function including Church Planting, Worship Leader and Youth Pastoring, Ruth and I attended Commonwealth Bible College (now Alphacrucis) from 1979-1981 and upon graduation served as assistants to Bryn Barrett in Toowoomba Assembly of God, Queensland. After three years as Senior Pastor of Mornington Assembly of God in Victoria we accepted a teaching position at the College where we have been ever since. I’ve never lost the passion for Pastors, having been one myself, and love to itinerate and encourage, particularly the rural Pastor who doesn’t often entertain visiting ministry. Of recent times I’ve also ministered in other countries which has helped me enormously in grappling with the cultural/transcultural nature of Scripture. Ruth and I were married in 1971, we have three married children and six grandchildren who are a joy and keep us very busy.

Pastor Daryl Potts (faculty profile)

Daryl J Potts is a recent addition to the team at Alphacrucis College, and is the Program Director for the Bachelor of Ministry Program.  Daryl’s particular area of expertise is in pastoral praxis and managing the spill-over of ministry work and responsibilities into the relational areas of the minister’s marriage and family.  Daryl is currently working on a Doctoral Thesis that is investigating the impact that being involved in ministry has upon the family life of the minister.  Daryl lectures in ministry based courses such as Church and Society, Foundations of Pastoral Ministry, Pastoral Administration and Management, Communicating the Christian Faith, and Healing Ministry.

Prior to joining us at Alphacrucis College Daryl has been involved in pastoral ministry for thirty one years, starting out as a Youth Pastor upon his graduation from Bible College, and then being involved in pioneer, mid-size, large and Mega churches in Associate and Senior pastoral roles in churches across our nation.  He has served the AOG/ACC in various roles such as Youth Alive, District and Regional Leadership, State Executive membership and was Vice President on the State Executive in South Australia until he relocated to take up his role at Alphacrucis.  He brings the wealth of these experiences as a pastor and leader to the ministry stream of our college.

Dr Van Shore (faculty profile)

Van is married to Heazle and they have two adult children, Ben married to Lani and Amy married to Seng.  Van loves to laugh and celebrate with others their uniqueness in God and enjoys walking, bird watching, tennis and good food. He has almost 20 years of pastoral ministry and teaching experience.

In 2009, Van was selecetd along with a number of New Testament scholars throughout Australia to write a chapter in The Content and Setting of the Gospel Tradition (Eerdmans, 2010). Dr Mark Harding and Dr Alana Nobbs co-edited the work.  Van's chapter was called "The Titles of Jesus".

In 2011, Van also authored two books: The Art of Not Disappearing (River Publishing, UK), and in 2011-2012, while living in Bangkok, he wrote his second book, The Art of Not Getting Lost on the Way Home.  This was prior to joining the staff at the Alphacrucis College.  

Van serves as the Program Director for the Doctor of Ministry and Master of Theology.

Dr Jim Twelves (faculty profile)

As the Dean of Education and Program Director, Master of Teaching (Primary) and Master of Teaching (Secondary) Jim is responsible for the leadership, development and oversight of this exciting new faculty that was pioneered by Dr Jennie Bickmore-Brand.  Jim is currently responsible for EDU500 Professional Experience; EDU401 Foundations in Christian Learning and Teaching; EDU502 History and Geography; EDU522 The Self-Reflective Educator and RES502 Action Research. Prior to Jim’s emigration to Australia in 1995 he was Head of Geography in Aldenham School, Hertfordshire, United Kingdom for nearly 20 years where his passion for learning and teaching were formed. Since arriving in Australia he has held Deputy and Principalship roles in Victoria, New South Wales and Queensland. As Director of Twelves Consulting, with a team, he developed national policy frameworks for Christian schools. Jim also returned to university as a mature student gaining a Graduate Diploma in Educational Administration, Masters of Education and a PhD from Melbourne University.  His doctoral research; Putting them in the hands of God: A successful Australian Christian School was published as a book in 2013. Follow the link to read the full text.

Ms Greta Wells (faculty profile)

Dr Robyn Wrigley-Carr (faculty profile)

Robyn's love for theology and spirituality began when she was working in the Religious Books Department of Hodder & Stoughton Publishers in London. She subsequently went to Vancouver, Canada, to study her Masters in Spiritual Theology at Regent College. As part of her Regent degree, Robyn studied theology for a term at Oxford University, on a student exchange program. Robyn met her Kiwi husband at Regent, then they both returned to Sydney to live. Robyn worked as a lecturer in Spirituality for 8 years at the Australian College of Ministries (ACOM), and has lectured at MCSI (Macquarie University), Christian Heritage College, and tutored at the Broken Bay Institute. Robyn received an ORS scholarship and additional funding from the University of St Andrews to pursue her PhD full-time at the University of St Andrews, Scotland, and also tutored in Theology at the University. Since graduating in 2013, Robyn has been a sessional lecturer at both ACOM and AC. Robyn started as a permanent faculty member at AC in 2015. She has three gorgeous children.

Mr Andrew Youd (faculty profile)

Andrew Youd is married to Nicola, and they both live with their dog in the north western suburbs of Sydney. Andrew graduated with a BTh through Southern Cross College in 2009. He has just recently finished his MaCS and will be graduating May 2014. Andrew is an active member of Hillsong Church, serving with his wife at the Macquarie extension service. Andrew works with Dr. Shane Clifton in the Faculty of Theology. 

Entry Requirements

IELTS

International English Language Testing Service (IELTS) of 7, with a score of not less than 6.5 in any band, or equivalent.

Academic Entry Requirements

Completion of a AQF Level 7 bachelors degree or completion of a AQF Level 8 or above postgraduate qualification (a completed postgraduate certificate with a credit average overall).


Fees

Complete Fee Schedules and FEE-HELP information (where appropriate) for all Alphacrucis courses can be found in our Documents section, under the Fees and FEE-HELP Information link.


Units offered as part of this Award:

ANL401 - Old Testament Hebrew I

Outcomes:

Upon completion of this subject, students should be able to demonstrate an elementary working knowledge of biblical Hebrew, including:

  • ability to identify and write Hebrew alphabet and vowels;
  • recognise and translate most frequent Hebrew vocabulary;
  • identify basic Hebrew grammatical forms, including nouns, prepositions, adjectives, pronouns and construct chains;
  • analyse grammar and syntax of basic Hebrew sentences;
  • reproduce and translate conjugations in Qal & Niphal verbal stem;
  • identify and parse simple verbs in Qal & Niphal stems, using Dynamic Spatial Aspect

Additionally, students should be able to:

  • Exegete simple portions of Old Testament Hebrew texts
  • Demonstrate use of translation tools, such as dictionaries and concordances
  • Explain basic issues in interpreting the Hebrew Bible
  • Translate simple Old Testament Hebrew texts into contemporary English
Unit detail page >>

ANL402 - New Testament Greek I

Outcomes:

Upon completion of this subject, students should be able to:

Demonstrate an elementary working knowledge of New Testament Greek, including:

  • a.     ability to identify and write the Greek alphabet;
  • b.     recognise and translate most frequent NT Greek vocabulary;
  • c.      identify basic NT Greek grammatical forms, including nouns, prepositions, adjectives, pronouns, and verbs;
  • d.     analyse grammar and syntax of basic Greek sentences;
  • e.     Identify, parse, and translate simple verbs.

Display a knowledge of basic language learning techniques;

Demonstrate the benefit of learning NT Greek for the study of the New Testament;

Read and translate simple portions of the Greek NT, demonstrating working knowledge of sentence structure and basic aspects of syntax.

Unit detail page >>

ANL501 - Old Testament Hebrew II

Outcomes:

Upon completion of this subject, students should be able to demonstrate an intermediate working knowledge of biblical Hebrew, including:

  • recognise and translate frequent Hebrew vocabulary;
  • analyse grammar and syntax of intermediate Hebrew sentences;
  • recognize and translate participles, volitive verbs, infinitives;
  • reproduce and translate verbs in Piel, Pual, Hiphil, Hophal, Hithpael verbal stems;
  • identify and parse verbs in all stems using Dynamic Spatial Aspect, including commonly occurring weak roots.

Additionally, students should be able to:

  • Demonstrate an intermediate understanding of the syntax of biblical Hebrew evidenced in the ability to exegete more demanding texts.
  • Demonstrate confident use of lexical and analytical aids to study the Hebrew Old Testament.
  • Translate portions of the Hebrew Scriptures into contemporary English.
Unit detail page >>

ANL502 - New Testament Greek II

Outcomes:

Upon completion of this subject, students should be able to demonstrate an advanced knowledge of New Testament Greek, including:

  • recognise and translate most frequent NT Greek vocabulary
  • identify more complex NT Greek grammatical forms, including participles, adverbs, verbs outside the indicative mood, and athematic verbs
  • analyse grammar and syntax of intermediate NT Greek sentences
  • identify, parse, and translate verbs with reference to verbal aspect theory

Additionally, students should be able to:

  • Demonstrate an advanced understanding of the grammar and syntax of NT Greek, evidenced in the ability to exegete more complex passages.
  • Use lexical and analytical aids to study the Greek New Testament.
Unit detail page >>

BIB401 - Introduction to the Bible

Outcomes:

Upon completion of this subject, students should be able to:

  • Demonstrate an understanding of meta-narrative of Scripture, including a knowledge of the key events and ideas of the Bible.
  • Explain how the Old Testament and New Testament relate, and evaluate the significance of the canonical placement of the books of the Christian Bible.
  • Identify the various genres of biblical texts and apply appropriate reading strategies to these genres
  • Demonstrate skills in the selection and exegesis of the biblical text.
  • Apply the biblical text to contemporary Christianity, demonstrating an understanding of issues pertaining to the content, theological contribution and significance of the Bible.
  • Evaluate the historical, geographical, social, and religious background to the Old Testament and the New Testament.
Unit detail page >>

BIB502 - Interpreting Scripture Today

Outcomes:

Upon completion of this subject, students should be able to:

  • Compare critical and methodological approaches to the study of the biblical text and canon.
  • Explain the historical and philosophical development of the interpretation of Scriptures within the Christian tradition.
  • Analyse and critique selected methods and their contribution to the solution of particular exegetical or theological issues.
  • Apply reading methods to interpret passages of Scriptures in the light of their historical and literary context.
  • Demonstrate critical engagement with both the primary biblical materials and secondary literature from a range of perspectives.
Unit detail page >>

BIB510 - Old Testament Poetry

Outcomes:

Upon completion of this subject, students should be able to:

  • Summarise the various forms and uses of poetry in the Old Testament.
  • Analyse poetic techniques used in texts, such as imagery, parallelism and literary devices.
  • Critically analyse selected poetic texts from the Old Testament.
  • Demonstrate critical engagement with both primary and secondary texts.
  • Compare the use of poetic texts in a diversity of contexts in the Old Testament, such as their use in the home and cult as well as their rhetorical use by the prophets.
  • Describe the influence of Ancient Near Eastern poetry in the development of Hebrew poetry.
Unit detail page >>

BIB511 - Old Testament Prophets

Outcomes:

Upon completion of this subject, students should be able to:

  • Describe the development of the biblical prophetic traditions of the Old Testament from social, historical and theological perspectives.
  • Identify key features of prophetic traditions from the wider ANE and Ancient Mediterranean world that transcended cultural boundaries.
  • Analyse and critique selected texts from biblical and extra-biblical sources for their contribution to the discussion of the prophetic traditions.
  • Demonstrate critical engagement with both primary and secondary texts.
  • Compare the development of the role of the prophet in the inter-testamental, Jesus traditionand the early church period.
  • Describe the diverse approaches to understanding the nature and role of prophetic traditions in the Old and New Testaments as applied to the contemporary Pentecostal movement.
Unit detail page >>

BIB532 - BIB532 Isaiah

Outcomes:

  • Analyse the religious, historical, geographical and social settings of Isaiah;
  • Explain the significance of the message of Isaiah to the Christian church today;
  • Evaluate contemporary scholarship and literature relating to Isaiah;
  • Critique key theological themes of Isaiah;
  • Summarise the different theories of the authorship of Isaiah;
  • Assess the significance of the servant in Second Isaiah and consider how it relates to Jesus Christ.
Unit detail page >>

BIB550 - Reading the Synoptic Gospels

Outcomes:

Upon completion of this subject, students should be able to:

  • Describe the distinctive symbolism, structure, style, theology and rhetoric of the New Testament gospels.
  • Critique the contemporary debates concerning the origin, unity, ideology and ethics of the gospel narratives.
  • Critically evaluate both the primary biblical materials and secondary literature from a range of perspectives.
  • Explain the historical, geographical and social background of the gospels.
  • Summarise the key theological themes of the gospel narratives.
Unit detail page >>

BIB551 - New Testament Letters

Outcomes:

Upon completion of this subject, students should be able to:

  • Explain the principal literary forms, uses and major themes of Epistles in the New Testament.
  • Evaluate the narrative worldview implicit within Pauline theology.
  • Demonstrate critical engagement with both primary and secondary texts.
  • Describe the historical, geographical, social background and the literary nature of the New Testament letters.
  • Analyse the use of rhetorical devices in the New Testament Epistles.
  • Critically analyse selected texts from Romans.
Unit detail page >>

BIB554 - BIB554 The World of the New Testament

Outcomes:

  1. Assess and summarise the first-century culture surrounding the NT
  2. Illustrate in-depth the role and function of Christians as members of the body of Christ and the broader community based on a similar understanding of the first-century church
  3. Critically analyse and discuss various NT passages and themes through historical-critical exegesis and engagement with a wide variety of primary and secondary sources
  4. Evaluate and reconstruct the historical background and social context of the NT
Unit detail page >>

BIB562 - BIB562 Romans and Galatians

Outcomes:

  1. Demonstrate competency in analysing passages in Romans and Galatians and relate them to modern Pentecostalism;
  2. Deduce Paul's concern for, and correction of an erring church as per Romans/Galatians in the light of Pentecostalism;
  3. Discriminate between the primary biblical materials and secondary literature from a range of perspectives;
  4. Analyse and reconstruct the socio-historical background relevant to Romans and Galatians, as well as the letters’ respective structures, themes, theology/ies and style
Unit detail page >>

BIB563 - BIB563 I & II Corinthians

Outcomes:

  1. Demonstrate competency in analysing passages in passages in Corinthians and relate them to modern Pentecostalism
  2. Deduce Paul's concern for, and correction of an erring church (as per 1&2 Corinthians) in the light of Pentecostalism
  3. Discriminate between the primary biblical materials and secondary literature from a range of perspectives
  4. Analyse and reconstruct the socio-historical background relevant to Paul’s Corinthian correspondence, as well as the letters’ respective structures, themes, theology/ies and style
Unit detail page >>

BIB590 - New Testament Field Study

Outcomes:

Upon completion of this subject, students should be able to:

  • Describe the physical and historical geography of some of the places and surrounding nations in which Paul worked.
  • Evaluate the significance of events that occurred at Field Study Trip locations that are recorded in the New Testament Scriptures, with particular attention to how the geography influenced the events.
  • Analyse the importance of a specific  location for subsequent interpretations and appropriations of the NT material related to it  e.g. in cross cultural contexts.
  • Assess the ideologies that were at play in the locality, e.g. Paul’s engagement with the Epicureans and Stoics in/on the Areopagus in Athens.
  • Evaluate the significance of Paul’s choice of church plant locations for modern Christians.
  • Analyse and synthesise their field study experience with their biblical studies, a Christian world view, and their vocational interests.
  • Describe the culture and religions of the area, especially Judaism, Islam and the variety of Christian traditions, so that they may appreciate the value of interfaith dialogue.
Unit detail page >>

BIB592 - Old Testament Field Study

Outcomes:

Upon completion of this subject, students should be able to:

  • Describe the physical and historical geography of Old Testament locations.
  • Explain the key elements of the religion and politics of the area, especially as it relates to Judaism, Islam and the variety of Christian traditions, so that they may appreciate the value of interfaith dialogue.
  • Evaluate the significance of the geography and history of key locations recorded in the Old Testament Scriptures, with particular attention to how the geography of the land influenced the events.
  • Analyse the significance of ‘land’ for biblical Israel, modern Israel and the Palestinian Territories, and modern Christians.
  • Analyse and synthesise their field study experience with their biblical studies, a Christian world view, and their vocational interests.
Unit detail page >>

CCM401 - Introduction to Cross Cultural Ministry

Outcomes:

Upon completion of this subject, students should be able to:

  • Define cross cultural ministry and critically analyse the significance of this understanding for local churches and their community and global responsibility.
  • Describe and evaluate a viable  philosophy and strategy for cross cultural ministry in  local church and mission organization contexts.
  • Compare and contrast available methods for actively promoting the cause of global mission perspectives.
  • Critically evaluate the breadth of activities comprising the Church’s cross cultural ministry.
  • Analyse the challenge and opportunities of cross cultural ministry to people in Australasia and beyond.
  • Critically reflect upon personal and corporate responsibility for cross cultural ministry in the fulfilment of the great commission.
Unit detail page >>

CCM504 - Church Planting and Contemporary Christianity

Outcomes:

Upon completion of this subject, students should be able to:

  • Explain in detail the historical, biblical and theological foundations for church planting.
  • Distinguish a wide range of church planting models in use by Christians throughout the world.
  • Critique past, present and potential future developments in church planting, focusing on key characters and events.
  • Compile and assess data that would indicate the need for new and revitalised churches.
  • Explain the value of church planting to the wider society.
Unit detail page >>

CCM505 - CCM505 Exploring Islam

Outcomes:

  1. Discuss the religious history of Islam, including key figures and events;
  2. Analyse the central elements of Islamic faith and practice;
  3. Analyse and evaluate the changing face of Islam in the modern world
  4. Differentiate key areas of similarity and difference between Christianity and Islam;
  5. Critique typical misconceptions about Islam;
  6. Critically appraise the various Christian approaches to effective interaction with Muslims
  7. Compare and evaluate opportunities for engaging in positive communication and developing relationship with Muslims
Unit detail page >>

CCM506 - Innovative Practice in Cross Cultural Ministry

Outcomes:

Upon completion of this subject, students should be able to:

  • Explain the relevant global themes related to cross cultural ministry using biblical, historical, demographic and statistical information.
  • Distinguish a wide range of  models for cross cultural ministry in use by Christians throughout the world.
  • Critique past and present cross cultural ministry approaches, focusing on key characters and events in the development and diffusion of those approaches.
  • Analyse the key nationwide aspects that have a bearing on cross cultural ministry practices in local regions.
  • Develop and critique strategies appropriate for a given country.
Unit detail page >>

CCM507 - Missions from the Majority World

Outcomes:

Upon completion of this subject, students should be able to:

  • Explain in detail the biblical and theological foundations for missions as an ongoing movement from every nation to every nation.
  • Distinguish examples where Western missions have helped or hindered the establishment of missions in non-Western church movements.
  • Critique past, present and potential future developments of the majority world's mission endeavours.
  • Compile and assess data that indicates the strengths and weaknesses of majority world missions and missionaries in the 21st century.
  • Explain how there can be a symbiosis between mission endeavours from the Western and majority world church.
Unit detail page >>

CCM510 - Cross Cultural Ministry Field Practicum

Outcomes:

Upon completion of this subject, students should be able to:

Deduce and analyse issues arising in a range of mission settings. This includes consideration of other Christian perspectives and understandings.

Critically contrast community systems and structures in contrast to foreign systems and structures as related to mission involvement.

Identify resources (people, systems, and others) for working in a mission setting.

Evaluate theological issues that relate to the practice of cross cultural ministry.

Design and evaluate a strategy or project for a mission setting.

Discuss the importance of developing skills for coping with the pressures of working in a mission setting.

Unit detail page >>

CCM592 - Cross Cultural Ministry Field Study

Outcomes:

Upon completion of this subject, students should be able to:

  • Demonstrate a detailed knowledge of the historical, cultural and religious background of the specific location.
  • Critically assess key individuals and movements significant in the development of Christian faith in that location.
  • Explain the importance of the location for the spread of the various religions represented there.
  • Display an advanced  understanding of the culture and non-Christian religions of the area, assessing the value of interfaith dialogue.
  • Discuss the ideologies that are at play in the locality, e.g. government policies, social movements, etc.
  • Integrate academic studies with vocational interests and the strategic aspects of what is needed for the advancement of Christian faith in that area.
Unit detail page >>

COM500 - Communication Theory

Outcomes:

Upon completion of this subject, students should be able to:

  • Demonstrate an in-depth understanding of communication theory and its relation to practice, particularly theories relating to interpersonal and intercultural communication.
  • Demonstrate advanced ability to critically engage with communication theory in a specific area.
  • Demonstrate a broad understanding of a range of communication theories.
Unit detail page >>

COM502 - Organisational Communication

Outcomes:

Upon completion of this subject, students should be able to:

  • Demonstrate broad understanding of literature in organisational communication.
  • Demonstrate ability to critically engage with organisational communication theory and apply it to practical context.
  • Demonstrate ability to critically analyse an existing organisational structure/communication plan and propose means of improvement based on theory and broader literature.
Unit detail page >>

COM503 - Issues in Interpersonal Communication

Outcomes:

Upon completion of this subject, students should be able to:

Critically engage with a wide variety of literature in interpersonal communication.

Demonstrate advanced understanding of interpersonal communication theory and apply concepts to practical situations.

Demonstrate an understanding of the importance of the study of interpersonal communication systematically and empirically.

Unit detail page >>

COM504 - Preaching and Public Communication

Outcomes:

Upon completion of this subject, students should be able to:

  • Demonstrate ability to communicate concisely and effectively.
  • Demonstrate ability to contextualize message content to various audiences.
  • Demonstrate ability to exegete and/or unpack theoretical concepts and explain their practical relevance and ability to effectively use verbal and nonverbal skills in public communication.
  • Analyse and demonstrate advanced knowledge of tools/literature in communication available to today’s preacher/public speaker.
Unit detail page >>

COM505 - Theory and Practice of Intercultural Communication

Outcomes:

Upon completion of this subject, students should be able to:

  • Analyse, synthesise, and critique relevant literature in intercultural communication.
  • Proficiently apply theoretical concepts to practical contexts.
  • Articulate complex understanding of how culture influences communication and the processes involved in pragmatically developing intercultural communication competence.
Unit detail page >>

EXP501 - Professional Practice

Outcomes:

Upon completion of this subject, students should be able to:

  • Identify key competencies required for their chosen field of professional practice.
  • Demonstrate an advanced ability to apply these competencies to real-life contexts and workplace situations as appropriate to their experience and goals.
  • Critically evaluate the development of their professional skills inassociation with their field practice.
  • Demonstrate an in-depth understanding of the realities of facilitated learning in the field of professional practice.
  • Critically evaluate personal actions in professional practice through dynamic reflection.
Unit detail page >>

HIS401 - History of Christianity

Outcomes:

Upon completion of this subject, students should be able to:

  • Display detailed knowledge of the methods and skills used by historians, including those used to study primary documents, movements, issues and time periods.
  • Describe the sweep of the Christian tradition from both an historical and global perspective.
  • Critically analyse the importance of past foundations and future directions of the church.
  • Demonstrate an indepth understanding of the interaction of the church with wider society over time.
  • Recognise the role of identity formations (e.g. gender and racial diversity, nationalisms and transnationalisms) in the Christian story as it has been lived out in cross cultural contexts.
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HIS501 - Christianity in Australia

Outcomes:

Upon completion of this subject, students should be able to:

  • Demonstrate a detailed knowledge of the major themes in Australian religious history, including national identity formation and indigenous religions.
  • Identify and explain the foundational and developmental stages of key denominational groups in early Australian Christianity.
  • Critically analyse the interaction of social, political and cultural factors in shaping Australia’s Christian history.
  • Exhibit an advanced ability to research the historical record from primary and secondary sources and critically analyse the results.
  • Critically evaluate the impact of post war renewal movements.
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HIS502 - Early and Medieval Christianity

Outcomes:

Upon completion of this subject, students should be able to:

  • Demonstrate a detailed knowledge of the context, origins, development and expansion of early and medieval Christianity.
  • Critically analyse the contributions of key characters and events in early Christianity.
  • Identify various social, cultural and theological issues facing Christians in the early church.
  • Exhibit an advanced ability to research the historical record from primary and secondary sources and critically analyse the results.
  • Exhibit proficiency in contextualisation of medieval Christian thoughts and actions within its historical period.
  • Demonstrate an understanding of the formative influences of medieval Christianity in contemporary contexts.
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HIS510 - Renewal Movements in Christianity

Outcomes:

Upon completion of this subject, students should be able to:

  • Demonstrate a detailed knowledge of the development of renewal movements in Christianity from their origins to the present day.
  • Critically analyse the contributions of key characters and events, and their interpretation in the contemporary historiography of these movements.
  • Identify social, cultural and theological issues influencing various renewal streams.
  • Demonstrate a deepening understanding of the nature of contemporary pentecostalism and its impact on global Christianity.
  • Exhibit an ability to research the historical record from primary and secondary sources and critically analyse the results.
  • Exhibit an ability to synthesise and integrate insights from the history of renewal movements to Christian life and ministry today.
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HIS520 - Women in Christian History

Outcomes:

Upon completion of this subject, students should be able to:

Demonstrate a detailed knowledge of the role of prominent women in early and medieval Christian history.

Demonstrate a detailed understanding of the variety of contributions of women in modern Christian history and their key characteristics.

Exhibit an ability to research the historical record from primary and secondary sources and critically analyse the results.

Critically evaluate the role of Christian women in history, including within religious and secular communities.

Explain and communicate a variety of divergent attitudes regarding women in ministry during the 20th and 21st centuries.

Recognise the contribution of Australian women to Christianity.

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MIN401 - Foundations of Pastoral Ministry

Outcomes:

Upon completion of this subject, students should be able to:

  • Outline a biblical basis for pastoral ministry.
  • Display detailed knowledge of the breadth of issues relevant to pastoral ministry.
  • Describe the convergence of life journey, spiritual experiences and ministry opportunities in developing pastoral ministry.
  • Differentiate between various facets of pastoral ministry.
  • Demonstrate an indepth understanding of pastoral care in line with various relevant models and theories.
  • Critically analyse pastoral issues as they relate to the well-being of the congregant, pastor, congregation and community.
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MIN402 - Christian Spirituality

Outcomes:

Upon completion of this subject, students should be able to:

  • Identify the implications of one’s theological and biblical framework on approaches to spirituality and vocation.
  • Critically discuss views of spirituality from different denominational backgrounds.
  • Demonstrate an advanced ability to extend approaches to the experience of God beyond those dominant in Pentecostal and charismatic movements.
  • Display an indepth understanding of traditional and contemporary expressions of spirituality, including indigenous spirituality.
  • Exhibit an advanced ability to identify and use a range of spiritual disciplines for the purpose of developing individual and corporate spirituality.
  • Critically analyse how Pentecostal and Charismatic expressions of faith can be enhanced by other Christian perspectives and understandings of spirituality.
  • Explain and communicate the relationship between spirituality and life vocation.
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MIN502 - The Evangelism-Discipleship Continuum

Outcomes:

Upon completion of this subject, students should be able to:

  • Demonstrate a thorough knowledge of the impetus for evangelism and discipleship, as found in the story of Scripture and tradition of the Church.
  • Display awareness of   Christian contexts where evangelism and discipleship have been regarded as a single continuum.
  • Critically evaluate the various evangelistic and discipleship resources and strategies currently available to move people towards being fully devoted followers of Christ.
  • Demonstrate an understanding of the issues relating to an individual’s progression in their discipleship
  • Develop and critique effective strategic approaches to evangelistic and discipleship ministry for corporate contexts.
  • Analyse the place of outreach and evangelism in the mission of the church.
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MIN503 - Pentecostal Ministry Praxis

Outcomes:

Upon completion of this subject, students should be able to:

  • Analyse different Pentecostal contexts.
  • Critique relationships between the various facets of Pentecostal ministry praxis, such as theology, worship, preaching, healing, leadership, structure, community, and global engagement.
  • Demonstrate an advanced knowledge of global Pentecostal church dynamics and practices.
  • Analyse the relationship between worship, preaching and leadership.
  • Critically analyse how Pentecostal and Charismatic expressions of social and global engagement can be enhanced by other perspectives and understandings of the broader community.
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MIN504 - Cultural Exegesis for Christian Ministry

Outcomes:

Upon completion of this subject, students should be able to:

  • Develop a significant understanding of the tools of cultural anthropology, sociology and psychology.
  • Critically evaluate the application of these tools to gain insight into Christian ministry situations.
  • Demonstrate an understanding of key contributors in the fields of anthropology, psychology and sociology.
  • Demonstrate the ability to critically apply appropriate concepts from key social science contributors.
  • Analyse the significance of social science tools in understanding the Biblical text and making it understandable to those of other backgrounds.
  • Critically engage with key concepts within the fields of anthropology, psychology and sociology as would be used for effective ministry in diverse demographics, such as age grades, ethnic and socio-economic backgrounds.
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MIN505 - MIN505 Relationships

Outcomes:

  1. Integrate appropriate communication skills and courses of action within a range of relational settings, including personal and ministry contexts;
  2. Evaluate and critique the characteristics and processes of various relationship models\
  3. Demonstrate a thorough knowledge of the theological and biblical foundation for family ministry.  This includes consideration of a range of Christian perspectives and understandings;
  4. Critically evaluate a range of family ministries implemented by churches and church agencies, including education, prevention and strength-enhancing programs, crisis intervention, therapy, and family advocacy;
  5. Assess the importance of healthy relationships as a criterion for church and church agency ministries, as well as assessing such ministries and programs from this perspective.
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MIN506 - MIN506 Healing Ministry

Outcomes:

  1. Critically evaluate the biblical, historical and theological foundations for the ministry of healing;
  2. Assess various denominational views regarding health, illness and healing;
  3. Distinguish the role of key people who have been associated with various areas and movements of healing ministry
  4. Critically analyse the integrated relationship between Christian ministries of healing, Christian chaplaincy and other care services provided to the sick and dying;
  5. Critically assess and evaluate alternate theodicies and their implications for an understanding of sickness and healing practices

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MIN507 - MIN507 Church and Society

Outcomes:

  1. Demonstrate an ability to identify and critically analyse one’s own  individual and corporate identity formation within social and other contexts;
  2. Interpret and critically evaluate the historical development of contemporary western societies, modernity and postmodernity influences, and their relationships to religion;
  3. Appraise the role and value of the church within contemporary societies
  4. Demonstrate a growing proficiency in the technical language and research skills required to analyse, interpret and evaluate religious issues as mediated in public social science discourses;
  5. Illustrate and critically reflect upon the relationship between societal frameworks and communal Christian structures, systems of belief and behaviours;
  6. Devise an appropriate application of classical theories in the sociology of religion within Christian communal setting.
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MIN508 - MIN508 Church Planting

Outcomes:

  1. Assess the historical, biblical and theological foundations for church planting and church growth;
  2. Critically analyse the concept of needs-based, community-focussed church planting;
  3. Appraise and evaluate past, present and potential future approaches to church planting, focusing on the role played by key characters and events;
  4. Select, analyse and evaluate data that would indicate the need for new and revitalised churches
  5. Identify and integrate legal and structural considerations needed for church planting within specific church and community contexts;
  6. Critically assess and justify the value of church planting to the wider society.
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MIN509 - MIN509 Discipleship

Outcomes:

  1. Critically discuss biblical, historical and theological foundations of discipleship;
  2. Assess and evaluate approaches to discipleship used in the practice of contemporary ministry;
  3. Critically analyse the process of growth in Christian maturity to identify key factors that can assist or impede;
  4. Appraise and evaluate models that show the phases involved in the process of growth in Christian maturity;
  5. Compare and analyse the spiritual, interpersonal and social dynamics of discipleship within an Australian context;
  6. Critique various strategies of discipleship in contemporary congregations
     
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MIN510 - MIN510 Communicating the Christian Faith

Outcomes:

  1. Critically analyse and evaluate biblical, historical and theological foundations of communicating the Christian faith. This includes consideration of a diversity of Christian perspectives and understandings;
  2. Critically evaluate and demonstrate corporate and personal approaches to evangelism;
  3. Assess the role and place of outreach and evangelism in the mission of the church, and formulate an integrative framework for their application;
  4. Explain and integrate contextual frameworks that shape evangelistic communication, such as postmodernism, multiculturalism and a variety of cultural contexts, etc.;
  5. Design an effective evangelistic ministry for specific demographic, generational, social and cultural contexts;
  6. Demonstrate, appraise and justify the use of a variety of resources to communicate the Christian faith and enhance discipleship.

 

 

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MIN520 - MIN520 Youth Ministry

Outcomes:

  1. Analyse the biblical, historical and theological foundations for youth ministry including consideration of other Christian perspectives and understandings;
  2. Explain and evaluate the importance of understanding the themes and influences of contemporary pop culture;
  3. Appraise and critique shifts in youth culture and youth ministry in Australia;
  4. Based on personal involvement, critically analyse practical aspects of youth ministry;
  5. Explain and contrast the various sub-cultures which provide the context of youth ministry.
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MIN521 - MIN521 Children’s Ministry

Outcomes:

  1. Analyse and evaluate the biblical and historical background for children’s ministry. This includes consideration of other Christian perspectives and understandings;
  2. Appraise the breadth of children’s ministry strategies and analyse a variety of approaches to children’s ministry;
  3. Formulate and justify the skills necessary for effective ministry to children;
  4. Assess and evaluate methods of ensuring ministry is child safe and child friendly;
  5. Compose and critique administration, resourcing and logistic strategies necessary to facilitate an effective children’s event
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MIN525 - MIN525 Childhood and Adolescent Development

Outcomes:

  1. Explain and evaluate the biological, cognitive and social changes faced by children and adolescents;
  2. Analyse the forms of media that illustrate the journey of growing up;
  3. Interpret the major developmental and psychosocial issues experienced by children and adolescents, including emotional health, identity formation, peer and family relationships, substance abuse and sexuality;
  4. Critically analyse problems encountered by children and adolescents in contemporary society and justify approaches to working with those facing these problems;
  5. Assess the importance of childhood and adolescent development for targeted ministry;
  6. Critically appraise development theories, including Piaget, Erikson and Kohlberg.
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MIN530 - MIN530 Women and Christian Ministry

Outcomes:

  1. Critically evaluate the sociological and religious factors affecting gender roles throughout church history;
  2. Evaluate the role of the bible in the current debate over women in ministry and leadership
  3. Analyse the contexts in which female leaders operate in churches. This includes particular focus on Pentecostal contexts;
  4. Appraise the place of women in contemporary church ministries
  5. Assess the contribution of key Christian women, across historical and cultural boundaries, that have influenced the perception of women in ministry;
  6. Formulate a personal philosophy of women in ministry.
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RES401 - Postgraduate Research and Writing

Outcomes:

Upon completion of this subject, students should be able to:

  • Demonstrate the ability to analyse, synthesise, and critically engage with literature.
  • Demonstrate broad understanding of academic writing as a genre and the process of research.
  • Demonstrate broad understanding of methodologies, and underlying assumptions of different methods.
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RES500 - Independent Guided Research

Outcomes:

Upon completion of this subject, students should be able to:

  • Demonstrate knowledge of methodology (for example, ethnography, basic statistics, hermeneutics, etc.)
  • Identify and develop a research question in chosen major subject area.
  • Identify the appropriate research method to address the question.
  • Execute the method to complete the research, including significant literature review on the chosen topic.

Please note that as this is a research subject that you undertake with a supervisor, you need to start discussions with your Program Director (robyn.wrigley-carr@ac.edu.au ) to allocate a supervisor before you enrol in this subject. We recommend the earlier you do this the better it will be to set you up for a great research project!

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RES501 - Research Project

Outcomes:

Upon completion of this subject, students should be able to:

  • Demonstrate knowledge of methodology (for example, ethnography, basic statistics, hermeneutics, etc.).
  • Demonstrate an advanced ability to formulate a research question and outline an appropriate research plan for data collection.
  • Demonstrate broad understanding of basic statistical techniques in data interpretation.
  • Exhibit a critically reflective understanding of fundamental techniques and described methodological processes.
  • Produce a clearly expressed, well-structured and well-argued research essay, relative to the approved topic the research, which appropriately engages the peer-reviewed literature in the area.
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THE401 - Christian Worldview

Outcomes:

Upon completion of this subject, students should be able to:

  • Describe the sources used to inform a Christian worldview and apply consistent method in arriving at theological conclusions.
  • Examine alternate perspectives, and identify complementary and contradictory conclusions and arguments.
  • Identify central elements of a Christian worldview and show how these are impact individual spirituality and inform the life and mission of the church.
  • Give a critical account of the historical formation of Christian doctrines of God, creation and redemption and analyse contemporary formulations.
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THE501 - Christology

Outcomes:

Upon completion of this subject, students should be able to:

  • Appraise the conclusions of the quests for the historical Jesus.
  • Examine the development of early Christology through to the Chalcedonian definition.
  • Assess the contributions to Christology of key contemporary theologians.
  • Critically analyse the primary theories of atonement.
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THE502 - Trinity and Creation

Outcomes:

Upon completion of this subject, students should be able to:

  • Appraise the historical development of the doctrine of the Trinity, and analyse the explanatory power of traditional analogies.
  • Evaluate contemporary interpretations and applications of Trinitarian theology.
  • Discuss the significance of Trinitarian theology for spirituality and worship, religious pluralism, and the theology of creation.
  • Describe the relationship between the doctrine of the triune God and the problem of suffering.
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THE503 - Spirit and Church

Outcomes:

Upon completion of this subject, students should be able to:

  • Explain historical developments of pneumatology, including the filioque controversy.
  • Analyse contemporary theologies of the spirit.
  • Explain the development of Pentecostal pneumatology and appraise key distinctives, including the theology of baptism in the Spirit.
  • Demonstrate implications drawn from the relationship between pneumatology and ecclesiology and discriminate between alternate conceptions of the church.
  • Relate pneumatology to ecumenism and engage in ecumenical dialogue.
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THE510 - Theology and Popular Culture

Outcomes:

Upon completion of this subject, students should be able to:

  • Identify the ways in which the mediums of popular culture provide a window into the values and meanings contemporary life.
  • Apply hermeneutical tools for the purpose of understanding the meanings conveyed in film, television and contemporary music.
  • Discuss theological and ethical themes expressed through the various mediums of pop culture.
  • Design creative programs reviewing film, television and contemporary music.
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THE520 - The Church and Social Justice

Outcomes:

Upon completion of this subject, students should be able to:

  • Analyse different conceptions of the mission of the church and its significance for social justice.
  • Assess alternate ways in which religious communities have engaged with the economic, political and cultural structures that generate and sustain poverty, injustice and environmental issues.
  • Identify the local and global environmental and social challenges and analyse the types of response the church has and could make to them.
  • Show the ways in which issues of gender, culture and religion frame the experience of poverty and inform aid and relief projects.
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THE550 - Theology and Economics

Outcomes:

Upon completion of this subject, students should be able to:

  • Analyse the history of the relationship between Christian theology and economics.
  • Identify the issues involved in interdisciplinary scholarship.
  • Apply economic and theological analysis to a range of important contemporary issues, demonstrating an understanding of relationship between these two types of analysis.
  • Describe the place of economics in contemporary culture.
  • Compare and contrast various models on economic theory.
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XXX582 - Colloquium In ...

Outcomes:

Upon completion of this subject, students should be able to:

  • Propose a topic of research related to the broad categories of the colloquium, and draft a research proposal.
  • Demonstrate advanced research skills and critical engagement with alternative perspectives.
  • Develop a logical and coherent argument.
  • Present the results of research to peers.
  • Respond critically and generously to the research of others.
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