AC

Alphacrucis College

Rev Dr David Parker – ThD, MA (Theol)

Academic Faculty
Head of NT Studies

Profile photo for David Parker
Rev Dr David Parker
Head of NT Studies

David is a member of the School of Christian Studies, and specialises in the following areas: Biblical Studies.

Biography


After experiencing almost every church function including church planting, worship leading and Youth pastoring, Ruth and I attended Commonwealth Bible College (now Alphacrucis) from 1979-1981 and upon graduation served as assistants to Bryn Barrett in Toowoomba. After three years as Senior Pastor of Mornington Assembly of God in Victoria we accepted a teaching position at the College where we have been ever since. I’ve never lost the passion for Pastors, having been one myself, and love to itinerate and encourage, particularly the rural Pastor who doesn’t often entertain visiting ministry. Of recent times I’ve also ministered in other countries which has helped me enormously in grappling with the cultural/transcultural nature of Scripture. Ruth and I were married in 1971, we have three married children and six grandchildren who are a joy and keep us very busy.


Research Interests

My research interests include, but not exhausted by;

Luke-Acts particularly in relation to the unique/paradigmatic - that is, what should we be looking to duplicate in the power of the Spirit

John's material (excluding Revelation). I am most interested in the fulfilment motif in the Gospel and the response to incipient Gnosticism in the Letters.

Romans of course is the launching place for developing Paul's worldview which is my long-term project.

The Corinthians Correspondence fascinates me for developing a NT ethic particularly grounded in 1 Cor 9.

I keep returning to Galatians to nuance my understanding of the place of the (Mosaic) law in a Christian's life.

I have just begun a series of reflections on the Prison letters and Thessalonians and armed with only my Greek testament I'm challenged to wrestle with the text before seeking help from others. This keeps one sharp, and listening to the Spirit. I'm planning to do the same with the Pastorals since they pose many problems in transposing to the contemporary world.

Hebrews is alluring, just when I think I've got it, I'm surprised by other insights. It will hold endless fascination for me. I've not done a lot on Peter's material since finishing my doctorate in 1 Peter but it's enticing me and I will eventually re visit.

You will notice, other than a couple of General letters, a major omission in Matthew Mark and of course Revelation. I might have to leave these for the younger more adventurous already a long way ahead of me.

Other than book studies, I'm most interested in interfacing with the church and most pressing at the moment is the issue of same-sex attraction. Long term projects include a re examination of Pentecostal teaching from my youth such as initial evidence, sickness and healing and Spiritual Gifts.

Academic Qualifications

2008

ThD (SCD)
Dissertation Title An Exegetical Study of the Spirit in 1 Peter

1995

MA (Theol) (ACT (Moore))
Dissertation Title The Occasion of Romans

Selected Publications

Journal Article — Published in 2012

Citation: David M. Parker Tithing: Instruction or Instructive? Journal of Pentecostal Theology, Volume 21, Issue 2, 201 – 220, 2012 DOI: 10.1163/17455251-02102003 ISSN: 0966-7369 E-ISSN: 1745-5251

Extract: After surveying the disparate Old Testament material on tithing, this paper isolated 1 Corinthians 9 as the loudest echo of that practice. It then modelled 1Corinthians 9 and 10 as illustrative rather than regulative in its approach to the former testament. Utilizing the ‘lesser-to-greater’ (qal wāḥômer) argument inherent in 1 Corinthians 9, it developed an implied benchmark of tithing in 1 Corinthians 9 and 1 Tim. 5.17 to argue such as the base upon which NT giving is predicated. Noting the socio-economic disparity of Corinth, in comparison with the ideal distribution by which the Hebrew Scriptures regulated tithes, the paper then invoked the gift of giving from Rom. 12.8 to suggest proportional giving rather than the strict regulation of the Mosaic legislation. Finally, returning to the literary setting of 1 Corinthians 9, any conclusion, at least from the Pauline corpus, was shown to be contextually suggestive, not invariably regulative. Read more here… (external link)

Book — Published in 2011

Citation: David M. Parker An Exegetical and Theological Study of the Spirit in 1 Peter: Strength for Today and Hope for Tomorrow VDM Verlag Dr. Müller (February 2, 2011) ISBN-10: 3639330528 ISBN-13: 978-3639330526

Extract: From the position that 1 Peter is an epistle, I establish an inaugurated eschatological proleptic which informs the letter proper and then propose an original parsimonious working model by which to carry out exegetical analysis of selected (pneuma) texts. A synthesis concludes the thesis, proposing the Spirit’s place in the symbolic universe sketched by 1 Peter as compared with first and second Temple, and Intertestamental Judaisms. My conclusion is that the argumentative strategy of 1 Peter appeals to the qal-w hômer superlative of God’s presence by the Spirit in the experienced symbolic universe of his addressees as an antidote to assimilation, on the one hand, and isolation, on the other, from the situated shaming cultural milieu. Parallels between birth and consummation of Israel and Peter’s addressees constitute a world-view designed to ameliorate the dissonance perceived by the author for the ambivalent status of his recipients proleptically announced in his identification of recipient unit (1:1-2), eklektos parepidmos diasporas. Read more here… (external link)

Book — Published in 2011

Citation: David M. Parker Reading Philippians Now and Then VDM Verlag Dr. Müller (January 26, 2011) ISBN-10: 3639326652 ISBN-13: 978-3639326659

Extract: This book offers a self-paced reading of Philippians. Using leading questions you are guided to discover what meaning Philippians’ first recipients would likely conclude. You are then stimulated to consider how it might apply in your life and among your circle of influence. By using this book you will be able to understand and apply Paul’s material. You will come to appreciate more than ever the genius of Paul as he is moved by the Holy Spirit to write not only THEN but in such a way as to have impact NOW. This is a practical, common sense book designed to help you gain confidence in reading Philippians. By making the findings of scholarship available to all, this book is for those who want to ?dig a little deeper’ and better understand the significance of what Paul wrote so many years ago. Read more here… (external link)

Book Chapter — Published in 2009

Citation: David M. Parker ‘Women in Ministry and the Home: Sampling a NT Perspective’ in Grey, J. & Clifton, S. Raising Women Leaders: Perspectives on Liberating Women in Pentecostal and Charismatic Contexts Sydney: APS 2009, 111-132. ASINB00BUUKGX0

Extract: Examining the household codes, with a particular focus on 1 Pet 2:13-3:7 and 1 Tim 2:12-15, David Parker reasons why the texts are situation specific and explains the deep structure that upholds them, that being “the priority of the gospel and continual progress towards realizing Gal 3:28. Read more here… (external link)

Book — Published in 2008

Citation:

National Library of Australia Cataloguing-in-Publication entry Author: Parker, David M (Michael), 1951- Title: Learning new testament Greek now and then / David M. Parker. Edition: 1st ed. ISBN: 9781920770051 (pbk.) Series: Sydney College of Divinity texts ; 1 Notes: Includes index. Bibliography. Subjects: Bible. N.T.—Language, style. Greek language, Biblical—Grammar. Dewey Number: 487.4

Extract: This book offers a fresh approach to learning New Testament Greek by replacing the necessity of remembering by heart (rote). Instead, this book uses simple tools to help you identify Greek words and their meanings. Thus, allowing you to concentrate on Greek language concepts and how to apply them to passages in the New Testament. By using this book you will be able to understand your Greek New Testament after a dozen or so lessons, potentially within weeks instead of the months required by the traditional methods practiced in Colleges around the world. This is a practical, common sense book designed to help you gain confidence in reading the New Testament in Greek. It is for all people who want to ‘dig a little deeper’ and better understand the significance of that which is behind the many variations of the English Bible translations. Read more here… (external link)

Book — Published in 2008

Citation: David M. Parker Learning New Testament Greek Now and Then Sydney College of Divinity Press 2008

Extract: Learning New Testament Greek Now and Then offers a fresh approach to learning New Testament Greek! This book uses simple tools to help you identify Greek words and their meanings, allowing you to concentrate on Greek language concepts and applying them to passages in the New Testament. By using this book you will be able to understand your Greek New Testament after a dozen or so lessons, potentially within weeks instead of the months required by traditional methods practiced in colleges around the world. Learning New Testament Greek Now and Then is a practical, common-sense book designed to help you gain confidence in reading the New Testament in Greek. It is for all people who want to dig a little deeper and better understand the significance of that which is behind the many variations of the English Bible translations. Read more here… (external link)

Book Review — Published in 2001

Citation: Dawes, Gregory W. The Body in Question: Metaphor & Meaning in the Interpretation of Ephesians 5:21- 33 Biblical Interpretation 30 Leiden: Brill, 1998. Pp. xiv + 264. RBL 02/26/2001

Extract: Avowedly claiming to read in the context of the letter as a whole the purpose is achieved but essentially only at the semantic or thematic level. It would have proved most helpful if Dawes had proposed how this rhetorical unit contributes to the larger argument, some hint of which may be gleaned in his endorsement of quotations from Sampley and Kostenberger, particularly “married couples ought to see themselves ‘as part of the global eschatological movement toward ‘summing-up all things in Christ (Eph 1:9).’’” (pp. 12-13): “tantalizing hints” indeed. Secondly, in an Appendix, Dawes claims the author was deliberate in his ambiguous unitive/partitive “body” metaphor relating Christ and the Church (p. 248). Could not the author have been likewise “deliberately ambiguous” in the Husband/Wife “body” metaphor? Could a similar conclusion to that of Dawes be arrived at by developing the observation of Scanzoni and Hardesty, which he quotes approvingly, “the pattern found in Eph 5:21-33, ‘if allowed to work itself out over history…, could not help moving in the direction of egalitarianism and democracy in the home’” (p. 7)—a development along similar lines to that proposed by N.T. Wright, “How Can the Bible Be Authoritative?” Vox Evangelica 21 (1991), 7-32 and illustrated by R.T. France, Women in The Church’s Ministry - A Test Case for Biblical Hermeneutics Didsbury Lectures 1995; Carlisle: Paternoster 1995. Read more here… (external link)


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